Research

Together with our members, RPI selects and funds academic research relevant to the (re)insurance industry and assists in translating this research into usable and actionable results for our members.

RPI translates science into improved risk quantification by guiding scientists through funded research projects.

RPI welcomes all relevant research proposals which are judged democratically by our members. We have specific areas of interest also outlined in Requests for Proposal. You may download these RFPs and/or upload your proposal here.

 

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    How unusual was the 2005 hurricane season in the Atlantic? A Millennial Model Analysis

    The aim of this project is to determine whether climate conditions in the Atlantic TC formation basin in 2005 could be close to the most favorable conditions possible, or whether the climate system to could generate even more favorable conditions.

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    Intensity and Frequency of Severe Hailstorms

    This project seeks to increase the understanding of the intensity and frequency of hailstorms in order to better assess the risk hailstorms pose to (re)insurance companies.

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    Seasonal Tornado Forecasts

    The PI looks to establish an un-biased baseline climatology that accurately reflects where tornadoes are more and less likely to occur in the U.S., and develop a space-time model for tornado frequency/intensity whose output can be conditioned on slowly varying climate factors (e.g., El Niño, Madden- Julian Oscillation, etc.).

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    Development and Validation of an Engineering-Based Approach to Predict Tornado-Induced Damage

    The primary objective of this study is to address the need for development of engineering-based damage assessment models which are applicable to any region of the U.S., and for a full range of potential tornado characteristics (e.g. size, intensity, duration), providing an alternative to the existing empirical models.

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    What’s the Worst That Can Happen? Re-examining the Most Destructive Convective Storms over Europe

    This project looks to investigate the most destructive and most intense convective storms that have occurred in Europe within the last 150 years.

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    Evolution of Some Factors Influencing U.S. TC Landfall Probability: Formation Location, Steering, and TC-EC Interaction

    This study proposes to improve the understanding landfall variability through an examination of three factors known to influence landfall risk in the United States: 1) TC formation location, 2) Steering patterns resulting in “preferred pathways” toward landfall, and 3) TC-extra tropical cyclone interaction just before landfall.

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    Tropical Cyclone and Major Hurricane Return Periods from a Probabilistic Model of Hurricane Activity

    The probabilities of TC occurrence and environmental conditions are easily calculated from historical records, reanalyses and climate models. They will then be used to create global maps of TC and major hurricane return periods, and maps of how those return periods vary with changes in regional climate indices (e.g., ENSO or the AMM) and African dust outbreaks.

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    Seasonal Extra-tropical Storm Clustering (SeaStoC)

    The SeaStoC project will address the business relevant question of increased frequency of occurrence of severe, damage prone extra-tropical cyclone systems (ETCs) in one single season.